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RTK Query — Powerful data fetching and caching solution built on Redux

RTK Query is the latest addition to the Redux family and brings a much needed data fetching solution for apps using Redux to manage client side state.

GitHub: https://github.com/rtk-incubator/rtk-query
Docs: https://rtk-query-docs.netlify.app/

At the time of writing the library is in alpha so expect there to be changes.

Overview

The new library brings a simple data fetching API similar to ReactQuery and SWR that’s powered by Redux under the hood.

In my experience, working on large projects and reading online discussions from developers using Redux day-to-day the biggest issue is the massive flexibility and granular control you have with Redux (sounds like these should good things right?). …


As a developer you’ve probably seen or heard the famous quote;

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Premature optimisation is the root of all evil

It serves as good advice to help you avoid overengineering and reduce time to getting user feedback. But, like most rules there’s subtalties to when it should be applied.

The problem

Let’s imagine… you create a component for a page your team is working on to display a small list of users.

User list component rendering User components ordered by name

As per the requirements, it takes a small list of users and sorts them by name in alphabetical order. …


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Photo by William Hook on Unsplash

The modern version of the classic science fiction book 1984. People sat on their phones scrolling through their friends photos on Instagram. As they scroll, their camera watches their face as each post comes into view. Noting which ones encite a reaction, both positive or negative, which helps improve the algorithm that is becoming ever more personalised to them. The algorithm that ensures people are seeing the content that releases the most dopamine and in turn keeps them on the app longer…but maybe this isn’t just science fiction.

I see so many articles debating whether companies like Facebook are watching you through your phone camera, and as a developer I wouldn’t doubt it for a second. Knowing how simple it is to do and how much some companies rely on data, why wouldn’t they? …


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Photo by Ferenc Almasi on Unsplash

Test Driven Development (TDD) is a widely used term in the developer community, but until you really understand why it’s useful, it can be hard to see the benefit. Simply put, TDD is writing tests to define how your code should work, then writing code to make those tests pass.

This article will go through the basic way to develop using the TDD process by writing a simple function that adds two numbers together.

Note: This article expects you have a basic understanding of Jest.

Setup

We’ll set up a super simple project to get up and running, we won’t do anything fancy. …


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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Writing quality code is an art, an art that requires periods of patience and focus. When working on complex code, a developer has to keep many things in their head, from requirements to low level state, and to get to that productive state it takes time.

Unfortunately for most, losing that focus doesn’t take much. Having to answer a quick Slack message, although it may take only a few seconds, can be enough of a context switch to impact efficiency.

Communication is vital between everyone in a team, but the way most organisations handle it does not work well for developers. …


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As developers, we tend to be very optimistic and we often give lower estimates than we should. Even when working on a project with little amounts of pressure, we usually underestimate the time or complexity of a task.

There are many reasons that cause us to underestimate, and most come down to the old saying:

You don’t know what you don’t know.

No-one can always anticipate every issue that might arise, and there will always be times when even the biggest overestimate will be wrong, but making sure to keep that simple quote in mind will help you make better judgements when estimating work. …


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Photo by Farzad Nazifi on Unsplash

There’s a lot of guides on the best practices for code reviews but in practice it’s very hard to stick to those ideals. In the real world, teams are under pressure to deliver which leads to a decline in quality without solid processes in place.

In this post, I will try to set out a simple guide on how to implement beneficial but practical code reviews into your team’s development process.

Outline

  • What are code reviews and why do you need them?
  • Before you submit your code for review
  • Doing the code review
  • Implementing code reviews into your existing processes

I will occasionally reference technologies such as git as well as concepts such as a story from agile development. This is written more from a point of view of code reviews in web development, but I’ve tried to make it applicable to all areas.

About

Dillon Erhardt

Senior UI Architect @ihsmarkit. I talk about process, architecture and security. https://dillonerhardt.com

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